Video transcript

STEMI (ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction) is a heart attack which shows up as an abnormality on the electrocardiogram (ECG). Like all heart attacks, a STEMI is life threatening if not treated promptly.

A study published in the Medical Journal of Australia looked at data from 41 hospitals – almost 3,000 patients who had suffered a STEMI. The analysis showed that men received appropriate follow-up treatment. But most women did not.

Women who suffer heart attacks are under-treated. Post heart attack women were less likely to get – a coronary angiogram, preventative medication, or a referral for cardiac rehabilitation.

Six months post heart attack, women were twice as likely to die than men. Why? Women are less likely to believe they are at risk of dying from a heart attack. Doctors are less likely to be assertive in their follow-up.

Women are five times more likely to die of heart disease than breast cancer. Don’t think it can’t happen to you. It can.

Last Reviewed: 30/07/2018

myDr



References

Khan E et al. Differences in management and outcomes for men and women with ST-elevation myocardial infarction. https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2018/209/3/differences-management-and-outcomes-men-and-women-st-elevation-myocardial? Med J Aust || doi: 10.5694/mja17.01109