Video transcript

Are you ….

  • Emotionally exhausted?
  • Disinterested or demotivated with work?
  • Lacking desire for personal fulfilment?
  • Cynical towards the goals & aims of your workplace?
  • Feeling guilty about neglecting loved ones?
  • Depressed?
  • Abusing drugs & alcohol to cope with workplace stress?

You may be experiencing burnout at work.

In May 2019, the World Health Organization (WHO) classified burnout as an “occupational phenomenon”.  One in five Australian employees will experience mental health problems related to work & some professions pose a higher risk of burnout than others – like the emergency, medical & social service professions.

Burnout is the result of prolonged long hours of work where you’re under stress to deliver results and don’t feel valued or in control. Like any mental illness, the key to prevention is in treating the cause & not just the symptoms.
There’s no one-size-fits-all but consider:

  • the work place design – an open plan office and hot desking environment can be disruptive
  • provide clear and realistic expectations for all employees
  • employees should feel empowered to speak up when at capacity
  • resist working unnecessary overtime
  • focus on one job at a time and breakdown projects into smaller achievable parts
  • provide professional development opportunities
  • consider leadership approaches and how this impacts employees
  • workplaces should encourage healthy attitudes towards diet, physical activity &  alcohol consumption
  • encourage work/life balance, separating personal & professional time as much as possible.

If you think you’re experiencing, or may experience burnout, speak to your doctor

Last Reviewed: 14/11/2019

myDr