ACCUPRIL®

Quinapril hydrochloride


Consumer Medicine Information

What is in this leaflet

This leaflet answers some common questions about Accupril.

It does not contain all the available information.

It does not take the place of talking to your doctor or pharmacist.

All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you taking Accupril against the benefits they expect it will have for you.

If you have any concerns about taking this medicine, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Keep this leaflet with your Accupril tablets. You may need to read it again.

What Accupril is used for

Accupril is used to lower high blood pressure (hypertension). It is also used to treat heart failure.

Hypertension
Accupril is used to lower high blood pressure (hypertension). Everyone has blood pressure. This pressure helps get your blood all around your body. Your blood pressure may be different at different times of the day, depending on how busy or worried you are. You have hypertension (high blood pressure) when your blood pressure stays higher than is needed, even when you are calm and relaxed.

There are usually no symptoms of hypertension. The only way of knowing that you have hypertension is to have your blood pressure checked on a regular basis. If high blood pressure is not treated it can lead to serious health problems, including stroke, heart disease and kidney failure.

Heart Failure
Heart failure means that the heart muscle is weak and cannot pump blood strongly enough to supply all the blood needed throughout the body. Heart failure is not the same as heart attack and does not mean that the heart stops. Heart failure may start off with no symptoms, but as the condition progresses, patients may feel short of breath or may get tired easily after light physical activity such as walking. Some patients may wake up short of breath at night. Fluid may collect in different parts of the body, often first noticed as swollen ankles and feet.

How Accupril works

Accupril works by widening your blood vessels, which reduces pressure in the vessels, making it easier for your heart to pump blood around your body. This helps increase the supply of oxygen to your heart, so that when you place extra demands on your heart, such as during exercise, your heart may cope better and you may not get short of breath as easily.

Accupril belongs to a group of medicines called angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors.

Your doctor may have prescribed Accupril for another reason.

Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why Accupril has been prescribed for you.

Accupril is not addictive.

This medicine is available only with a doctor's prescription.

Use in Children

The safety and effectiveness of Accupril in children have not been established.

Before you take Accupril

When you must not take it

Do not take Accupril if:

  • you have an allergy to Accupril or any other medicine containing quinapril, or any of the ingredients listed at the end of this leaflet
  • you have taken any other 'ACE inhibitor' medicine before, which caused your face, lips, tongue, throat, hands or feet to swell up, or made it hard for you to breathe
  • you or your family have a history of swelling of the face, lips, tongue, throat, hands or feet for no apparent reason.

Symptoms of an allergic reaction may include skin rash, itchiness, shortness of breath, swelling of the face, lips or tongue, muscle pain or tenderness or joint pain.

If you have had an allergic reaction to an ACE inhibitor before, you may be allergic to Accupril.

Use of ACE inhibitors have been associated with Syndrome of Inappropriate Anti-diuretic Hormone (SIADH) and subsequent low blood sod