This table shows vaccinations included in the Australian National Immunisation Program Schedule as well as some other recommended vaccinations. Below the table is a brief explanation of the types of vaccinations used.

Vaccination: Australian Standard Vaccination Schedule

 

Vaccine
Birth
Hepatitis B
2 months
HepB-DTPa_Hib_IPV
(hepatitis B, diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis (whooping cough), Haemophilus influenzae type B, polio)
Pneumococcal vaccine
(13vPCV)
Rotavirus
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children: Meningococcal B
4 months
HepB-DTPa_Hib_IPV
(hepatitis B, diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis (whooping cough), Haemophilus influenzae type B, polio)
Pneumococcal vaccine
(13vPCV)
Rotavirus
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children: Meningococcal B
6 months
HepB-DTPa_Hib_IPV
(hepatitis B, diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis (whooping cough), Haemophilus influenzae type B, polio)
Rotavirus (third dose is dependent on the brand of vaccine used)
Pneumococcal vaccine
(13vPCV)for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in WA, NT, SA, Qld
and medically at-risk children
Influenza (annually): Children 6 months to less than 5 years; People 6 months and over with certain medical risk factors; and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 6 months and over
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children with specified medical risk: Meningococcal B
12 months
Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR)
Meningococcal ACWY
Pneumococcal vaccine
(13vPCV)
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children: Meningococcal B
18 months
Haemophilus influenza type B (Hib)
Measles, mumps, rubella, chickenpox (MMRV)
DTPa
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in WA, NT, SA, Qld: Hepatitis A – 1st dose
4 years
DTPa-IPV (Diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis (whooping cough) and inactivated polio)
Children medically at-risk and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in NT, SA, WA, Qld – Pneumococcal vaccine (23vPPV): one dose 23vPPV at 4 years, then 1 dose 5 years later
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in WA, NT, SA, Qld: Hepatitis A – 2nd dose
10-13 years (School programs – depends on state or territory)
Human papilloma virus (HPV): usually 2 doses
DTPa
14-16 years (School programs)
Meningococcal ACWY
Pregnant women
Influenza (flu) – every year
DTPa (ideally 20-32 weeks)
50 years
Tetanus-containing booster vaccine
(unless a booster given in previous 10 years)*
50 years and over 
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people without specific risk conditions: Pneumococcal vaccine (1 dose of 13vPCV + 2 doses 23vPPV)
65 years and over
Influenza (flu) – every year
DTPa (if not given in previous 10 years)*
70 years and over
Pneumococcal vaccine (13vPCV)
70-79 years
Shingles (herpes zoster)

*Not currently funded on National Immunisation Program

Australian Standard Vaccination Schedule: Influenza

The following groups are eligible for a free annual influenza vaccination funded by Medicare.

Children 6 months to less than 5 years of age
People 6 months and over with specified medical risk conditions
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 6 months and over
People 65 years and over
Pregnant women

Guide to the medical abbreviations used for the vaccines and diseases

Here is a guide to the terms used by doctors and healthcare workers to talk about the various vaccines. They have been colour coded to match the different vaccines on the chart.

Abbreviations used in the vaccination schedule
Abbreviation Meaning
Chickenpox Chickenpox (Varicella) vaccine.
DTPa Diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis (whooping cough) vaccine.
DTPa-IPV Diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis (whooping cough) and inactivated polio vaccine.
Hep A Hepatitis A
Hep B Hepatitis B
Hep B-DTPa-Hib-IPV Hepatitis B, diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis (whooping cough), Haemophilus influenza type B, inactivated polio
Hib Haemophilus influenza type B
HPV Human papillomavirus (infection with some types of HPV can cause cervical cancer and genital warts).
Influenza Influenza (flu) vaccine
Meningococcal ACWY Meningococcal groups ACWY
Meningococcal B Meningococcal group B
MMR Measles, mumps, rubella vaccine
MMRV Measles, mumps, rubella, chickenpox vaccine
Pneumococcal (13vPCV) A type of pneumococcal vaccine known as 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, that helps protect against 13 serotypes of the bacterium. Brand name: Prevenar 13
Pneumococcal (23vPPV) A type of pneumococcal vaccine known as 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, that helps protect against 23 serotypes of the bacterium. Brand name: Pneumovax 23. Number of lifetime doses now limited to 2 doses.
Rotavirus The most common cause of severe gastroenteritis in infants and young children.
Shingles Shingles (herpes zoster)

Last Reviewed: 28/09/2020

myDr


References

1. Australian Government Department of Health. National Immunisation Program. National Immunisation Program Schedule 1 July 2020. https://www.health.gov.au/sites/default/files/documents/2020/06/national-immunisation-program-schedule-for-all-non-indigenous-people_0.pdf
2. Australian Government Department of Health. National Immunisation Program Schedule 1 July 2020. For all Indigenous people. https://www.health.gov.au/sites/default/files/documents/2020/06/national-immunisation-program-schedule-for-all-aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander-people.pdf
3. Australian Government Department of Health. National Immunisation Program. Pneumococcal vaccination schedule from 1 July 2020. https://www.health.gov.au/sites/default/files/documents/2020/06/national-immunisation-program-pneumococcal-vaccination-schedule-from-1-july-2020-clinical-advice-for-vaccination-providers.pdf

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