Orgasm success down to anatomy

7 April 2016

7 April 2016

sensual couple

Differences in anatomy may help explain why some people experience orgasms more successfully than others.

A review of scientific studies suggests that for women, physical anatomy plays an important role. The closer the clitoris is to the opening of the urethra, the higher frequency of orgasm.

The researchers say that if the clitoris and the distance between the clitoris and the urethral opening are the keys to increased orgasm, “it seems reasonable to explore the area of clitoroplasty to heighten sexual function”, although they note that female genital plastic surgery is controversial.

No studies in the review questioned whether the size of the clitoris affects orgasmic success. And pelvic floor exercises were not shown to improve sexual satisfaction.

For men the most important aspect of achieving an erection and of ejaculating is a proper balance between the parasympathetic nervous system that controls the body at rest and the sympathetic nervous system that controls the body's "fight or flight" response.

Studies focusing on sexual dysfunction, such as erectile dysfunction and premature ejaculation, highlight differences in anatomy that may cause these unfavourable differences in sexual experience.

The researchers say the importance of penis size is still controversial.

“Most of the research surrounding whether bigger is in fact better is anecdotal,” they write in Clinical Anatomy.  

Additionally, they say it is unclear whether any perceived increase in orgasms when a partner has a larger penis is due to the psychological belief that bigger is tied to more masculinity, or if the actual difference in anatomy is causing an increase in orgasms due to the interaction between the larger penis and the female sexual organs.

The researchers also looked at whether obesity affects a woman’s sexual response. Their analysis suggests that it seems to only affect partner–partner sexual experiences, and not self-stimulation, hinting that it may be a psychological, rather than an anatomical, barrier to orgasm.

Last Reviewed: 7 April 2016
Reproduced with kind permission from 6minutes.com.au.

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References

Emhart E, et al. Anatomic variation and orgasm: Could variations in anatomy explain differences in orgasmic success? Clinical Anatomy 4 APR 2016 DOI: 10.1002/ca.22703
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